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OUTT Bucks The Trend To Create 5000 New Social Care Jobs

OUTT Bucks The Trend To Create 5000 New Social Care Jobs

In a move to challenge the misfortune of 2020, the social care temporary recruitment app OUTT is creating over 5000 new social care jobs in 2021.

Where many industries have endured shock waves of redundancies and business closures, social care remains vibrant, but as a sector, continues to be blighted with double-digit vacancy levels.

OUTT is a newly launched digital temporary recruitment app, backed by a share of £50 million InnovateUK funding. This valuable governmental support has aided the speed of development, the goal to increase post Covid employment opportunities and fill temporary shift vacancies quickly. OUTT sidesteps the need for traditional agency support by allowing the employer to connect directly with suitable candidates at a much-reduced cost.

5000 new social care jobs

By matching candidate availability with employer demand, the app removes barriers to employment. It offers complimentary skills training to support returning social care workers who wish to refresh their knowledge, meaning that flexible opportunities are available for those feeling the impact of the COVID-19 jobs crisis.

Recognition from InnovateUK cements the status of this new digital recruitment concept as part of the drive to regenerate the UK. The awarding body grants funding to businesses at the sharp end of accelerated innovation, with OUTT selected as an app that facilitates faster staff appointments and a dynamic way to meet workforce demand.

While agencies and contingent staff have long been the backbone of UK social care, OUTT confronts this unpredictable reliance. It introduces a contemporary way of working that reduces the time and cost constraints associated with agency fees, with additional opportunities for professionals to gain recognition through an employer review base to help them develop skills, experience, and knowledge.

Steve O’Brien, OUTT Founder & CEO, says, “Our initial concern was addressing the growing shortfall in social care keyworkers across the UK, then COVID-19 simply changed the way we all live and work. This allowed OUTT to embrace the change and fast track the social care sector into the 21st century. Our aim is to provide 5000 new social care jobs in 2021.

In addition, agency worker rights are too often tarnished with negatives such as workers charged for payroll or forfeiting holiday pay; this practice has got to stop. Technology provides social care with a transparent platform where candidates can take control and get the pay they deserve.”

Recruitment Compliance

As a vital component to the successful recruitment app, OUTT delivers full compliance testing protocols, with verification processes more usually aligned with banks and credit cards, thus increasing hiring speed and enabling rapid deployment where needed. This has never been more essential, especially with the changing legality of self employed worker through IR35, where the liability firmly lies with the end hirer. 

It is anticipated that, as demand for social care roles, homecare services, care homes, homelessness provisions and mental health services continue to skyrocket, digital innovation will provide the key to meeting those needs in a way that benefits the sector as a whole.

About OUTT

London based OUTT is a next-gen social care temporary recruitment app born from the COVID-19 pandemic. This UK Government-funded project provides a rapid route back to work for the UK, with expedited registration and compliance technology.

Registering with OUTT delivers opportunities for social care professionals to find work, build a review base, gain free skills training, and to take back control of where, when, and how they work.

Workforce managers have the opportunity to reduce overheads, fill vacancies quickly, plus significantly cut costs.

About Innovate UK

Innovate UK is part of UK Research and Innovation.

For more information, visit www.innovateuk.ukri.org

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Healthy Lunch Alternatives on Your Social Care Shift

Healthy Lunch Alternatives on Your Social Care Shift

We get it – you’re in the middle of a busy social care shift, have a short lunch break, and haven’t eaten anything since you snagged a bite of toast on your way out of the door this morning. It’s always tempting to grab a quick bite to eat from the canteen, or even nip out for a cheeky McDonalds!

However, as a carer, we’re willing to bet you’re on your feet for most of the day, and always feel that energy lag creeping in towards the end of your shift.  To stay healthy, and put as much care into yourself as you do into your patients, it is essential to make sure you’ve got a decent lunch!

Not only will that keep your energy levels up right until end of shift, but it’ll make you feel so much better about your food choices.

Self-Care for Carers

Self-care may be a buzzword you often hear, but it’s also essentially important. We all know you can’t pour from an empty cup, and since we’re all human, it is never going to be possible to work at 100 mph running on fumes. An NHS survey back in 2017 found that 25% of English nurses struggle with maintaining a healthy weight – and that demonstrates just how challenging it can be to prioritise your own diet when your career is all about helping others.

There’s also the added challenge of all those thank you cookies! It is fantastic to know that you’ve helped somebody, and to receive a token of appreciation – but less so when you realise you’ve existed on doughnuts for the past week… (Don’t worry; we’ve all been there!)

So, let’s look at some manageable, sustainable ways to prioritise your own self-care, to try and make sure as a carer you protect your own health.

How To Make Time for Lunch on a Social Care Shift

The first thing to think about is whether you actually take a lunch break. Yes, we know, it’s on the rota, but that is very different from taking it! The problem is that a lot of carers whizz past their lunch break without a second thought.

It’s easily done – you’re busy, running behind, a patient needs some extra support today, and all those good intentions about looking after yourself go out the window. Here are our top tips for making sure you find time to eat  – and that it’s something more substantial than a packet of crisps from the vending machine;

  1. Pack your lunch the night before: mornings are chaotic for the most organised of us. If you get your lunch ready and it’s sitting in the fridge ready to grab, you’re far less likely to forget than if you put more pressure on yourself to fix up a meal at the crack of dawn.
  2. Batch cook or meal prep. We’re not advocating you start following a bodybuilder lifestyle, but if you have one evening a week where you’ve got time to cook, it can be a great way of stocking up. Even if it’s boiling a load of eggs, chopping up chicken, or preparing a giant tub of pasta, the more quick and easy options you have in the fridge, the easier it is to steer clear of the staff room snacks.
  3. Use a shopping list. If you want to lead a more healthy life, the best place to start is in your trolley. Avoid the confectionary aisle (no matter how loud it calls you!), and make a list of all the ingredients you need to make the lunches you have planned out. If you can be disciplined enough to buy just what you need, you’ll save a bundle as well as having everything to hand to knock up a decent lunch for the rest of the week.
  4. Stocktake your Tupperware. One of the problems with bringing in lunch is keeping it hot or cold, and making sure it stays fresh until break time. You can buy any size or shape Tupperware in any supermarket, or invest in a decent thermos for hot pasta and soups.
  5. Treat yourself to a lunch box. It doesn’t need to be Paw Patrol themed either; you can get stylish lunch bags that provide insulation to keep your food cold. This is ideal for social care shifts where you don’t have a fridge available.

If you try to make it easier on yourself to get your lunch ready in advance, it makes being healthy a whole lot less stressful.

Healthy Lunch Ideas for Carers

Stuck for ideas? Tired of that sad, slightly soggy egg mayo sandwich? Find drab salads bland and unappetising? Same here.

Food should be healthy, energising, and enjoyable; your lunch is a well-deserved break in your social care shift, not an obligatory task that you don’t look forward to.

Here are some fantastic ideas for budget-friendly, easy to prepare, healthy lunches that you can make in a flash!

There are tonnes of lunches you can make that will keep you full till home time, stock you up on vitamins and healthy fats, provide a burst of energy, and won’t break the bank or take hours to prepare.

Some of the most straightforward options are also the best:

Pasta is very easy to batch cook, and you can add extra toppings or veggies to add variety. Think adding tomatoes and pesto, cheese and Mediterranean veg, tuna mayo – the possibilities are endless!

Salads provide a great bang for your buck when it comes to nutrition, and again you can make a bigger batch and portion it out over a few days. Make sure to avoid making a tub of lettuce; salad can be vibrant and delicious – think about goats cheese and beetroot, pomegranate and feta, or prawn and Marie Rose sauce. Even some ‘exotic’ veg like asparagus or sun-dried tomatoes make a salad a more flavourful option.

Soups are fantastic when you’re short on time, but are a lot healthier than a quick biscuit to dunk in your tea. Again, you can batch cook a vat of soup to last all week long, and use up any leftovers in your fridge to try out new combos. We love potato and leek (with a bit of bacon if we’ve been good!), a traditional chicken and veg for the winter, or a lighter carrot and tarragon for a fast burst of goodness.

Whatever you choose, make sure it’s something you enjoy and will look forward to. A great lunch is the best route to a winning day full of energy, vitality and health!

Interested in learning more about establishing that elusive work/life balance as a social care worker? Feel like you’re working every hour, but never have time to sit down to lunch? Check out OUTT, the new way to take back control of your live, shift patterns, pay, and social care career.

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Could You Work In Social Care?

Could You Work In Social Care?

Social carers are now considered ‘key workers’ in the UK, and more people than ever are considering roles to support others, as a result of a newfound respect for those helping our society function. Could you work in social care?

To work in social care isn’t to choose a career that will reward you hugely financially, or in status, but so much more. It is personally rewarding, hugely beneficial to those you work with and one of the most compassionate and impactful roles you could hope to work in.

What is Social Care?

Social care is a pretty broad term, but in short, refers to all of the personal care, protective care and practical assistance required for adults or children who need extra support in their day-to-day lives. This ‘extra support’ may be required for a variety of reasons: illness, disability, circumstance, family dynamic or living situation. Care may be provided by the state or obtained as needed privately.

Those who work in this sector may have one of several different job titles, including, but by no means limited to: social worker, social care worker, social carer, support worker, carer, family liaison officer and personal care worker.

Social care workers may work in a specific healthcare setting (or, in some occasions, a more formal specialist care centre) or in the homes of individuals. The exact responsibilities of the role depend on both the employer and the individual’s care needs.

Who Roles are there in Social Care?

Social care workers have a range of qualification levels: some just basic on-the-job healthcare training, and some full nursing training, depending on the requirements of the individual role. Social carers come from a variety of backgrounds, both professionally and personally, and are often dynamic and physically able people who are willing to work hard and always go the extra mile.

What Traits are Required in this Sector?

Of course, there is no one character profile to suit social carers, but there are some traits that are especially beneficial for the role. These include:

  • Patience – Social care workers often work long-term with service users and the journey to a better quality of life and/or not requiring care any more can be far from linear. Social carers need a great degree of patience and understanding to help nurture those they’re caring for to a better path and progress.
  • Empathy – those requiring social care are often in difficult or stressful circumstances and it’s important for those providing care to be empathetic and understanding. Bonding with individuals is key to a healthy and happy relationship, and isn’t something everyone has the ability to do.
  • Resilience – Social care work isn’t easy, and there are as many ups as there are downs. Situations and people can be difficult, and this takes a strong, resilient nature to handle. Carers working in social care should remain determined; never giving up at the first hurdle or when the going gets tough.
  • Respect – the nature of social care work is that it is sometimes received begrudgingly, and may even be met by resistance. Being able to hold and maintain respect for others – for those receiving care, for those working with carers, and for other professionals – is key to maintaining professionalism throughout your social care career.
  • Compassion – there are truly few professions that deal with as varied a clientele base as social care workers; and perhaps none! Therefore social care workers must remain kind and compassionate with all those they deal with, as well as politically agile, and able to speak to and effectively communicate and work with people of all levels, backgrounds, abilities and ages.

Finally society seems to be sitting up and acknowledging – and respecting – the huge contribution that social care workers make to those they serve and the communities that they work within. If you’re a compassionate ‘people person’ and want to really make a difference in the lives of others, and particularly, some of the most vulnerable people in society, now is the time to step up and make the first move to a new, rewarding, role.

Registering with OUTT provides experienced social care candidates the opportunity to build an employer review base and take full control of where and when they work. It’s your life, live it! Register with us now!

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4 Best Resources for Social Care Jobs in London

4 Best Resources for Social Care Jobs in London

Working in healthcare is an incredible career choice! Whether you’re just starting out or are looking to hop up onto the next rung of the ladder, we’ve got you!

Finding social care jobs in London can feel like a minefield. With so many different placements and career paths to choose from, let’s break it down to make your search for jobs just a bit less stressful…

What is Social Care?

As the name suggests, social care is all about caring for others. Now, more than ever, we all recognise how valuable our skilled healthcare workers are, making it an ideal time to get on board!

Social care jobs in London vary widely and include caring in sectors such as:

  • Children and early years
  • Mental health
  • Learning disabilities
  • Physical disability
  • Elderly and residential care
  • Occupational therapy
  • Community work and home care
  • Substance dependency
  • Homeless support

So to start with, think about what skills you have, and what kind of work you can see yourself enjoying.

Don’t worry if you’re not yet certain which sector you would prefer. We’ll take a look at different types of jobs, how social care shifts work, and how to choose the right healthcare career for you!

How Many Social Care Workers are there in London?

Across the UK, the demand for social care staff continues to grow. Skills for Care report that adult social care posts have increased by 140,000 jobs!There are now around 1.62 million social care posts in the adult care sector – so there is no shortage of demand for your skills!

Of those, a whopping 232,000 care jobs are based in London.

What Skills are Required in Social Care?

If you already have a few qualifications in the bag, you probably have a good idea about what sort of job you’re looking for.

Not to worry if you don’t yet though, lots of employers provide training and on the job qualifications, and the main skills you need to be a great social care worker include:

  • The ability to communicate clearly
  • Patience and a willingness to learn
  • Being a great listener
  • Having great organisation skills

Now you know that a career in social care sounds right for you, what’s the best way to find social care jobs in London?

The Best Resources to Find Social Jobs in London

One thing to bear in mind is that most jobs in the healthcare sector involve working social care shifts. Before spending lots of time on your job search, think what hours you can work, and how you plan to structure your career alongside other responsibilities.

Check out our top resources for finding social care work in the capital – you can even download a job search app to keep up to date with the latest vacancies as they pop up!

  1. OUTT

OUTT is a great place to find social care shifts. They have a free registration process, and once you sign up you will be connected directly with London employers who need staff quickly!

You can pick and choose which social care shifts you would like to work and maintain complete control over your career. The beauty is that OUTT only focuses on the social care industry, so you won’t find yourself flipping through irrelevant job matches.

  1. Indeed

If you’ve searched for a job before, you’ve probably heard of Indeed. This is an online advertising platform, where employers post their vacancies throughout the UK and across all job sectors. You can upload your CV, register for email alerts, and apply online for any jobs that catch your eye.

  1. Skills for Care

This resource is an amazing way to find information about the workforce, how many social care jobs there are in London, and what sort of pay grades you might be looking at. Skills for Care also publish some useful guidance to help you work out which qualifications are best for your chosen career, and support you in deciding what to do next!

4. Community Care Jobs

Our final recommended resource is another perfect way to find social care work. The site is dedicated to healthcare and allows you to filter by which sector you’d like to work in, location and the type of jobs you are looking for. Upload your CV, register for email alerts and stay on top of the game – who doesn’t want to be the first to know when your dream vacancy opens up!

We hope you find these resources useful, it’s an exciting time to be involved in the world of social care, and with so many career opportunities, it looks like an area of employment that is set to keep growing!

Registering with OUTT provides experienced social care candidates the opportunity to build an employer review base and take full control of where and when they work. It’s your life, live it! Register with us now!

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Working In Social Care in 2020

Working In Social Care in 2020

If you’re considering a career in the healthcare industry, you might feel a tad bit spoilt for choice. There’s a whole universe of jobs and career paths in this sector. One of the most increasingly popular choices is a job in social care – and there’s a ton of good reasons for this!

We thought we’d delve right into the topic and let you know just what it’s all about. That way, you’ll be able to judge for yourself whether this is the right job choice for you.

Hold Up – What is Social Care?

The definition of social care work can vary depending on the context – but, technically speaking, it covers the specialised and practical care given to children and adults who require extra support on a day-to-day basis.

This means that a social care worker can be supporting people of all ages and types of disabilities. To hear it straight from the horse’s mouth, here’s how the NHS defines social care:

“…it can be said that a social care need is one that is focused on providing assistance with activities of daily living, maintaining independence, social interaction, enabling the individual to play a fuller part in society, protecting them in vulnerable situations, helping them to manage complex relationships and (in some circumstances) accessing a care home or other supported accommodation.”

Who Actually Works in this Sector?

The simplest answer is: people like you. Most social care workers are drawn to such a career because they want to care for those who need support on a more personal level, rather than in a clinical setting like a hospital.

It’s incredibly common for individuals in this sector to report a very high level of personal achievement and self-satisfaction because of the work they do. People get the care they need, and workers end their shifts with a smile and the knowledge that they’re making a real, positive difference. It’s a win-win situation!

An effective social care worker will need to be a great listener as well as a fantastic communicator. They’ll also need a strong urge to help people; they say you should strive to make your passion into your career, and so a career in social care work is simply a no-brainer for many people.

There are almost 1.5 million people in the UK currently working in the social care sector. Though this may seem like a crazy amount of social care workers, the truth is the need for social care is only growing and many more of these jobs need to be filled in the next ten years.

What Can You do in Social Care?

You’ll be glad to hear that the structure of social care work is set up to help people develop their skills and move up into more senior roles if they so wish. Regardless, there’s a huge range of occupations which fall under the social care umbrella.

In general, social care workers can be found in private residential homes, in shared care homes, or in community centres. The most common duties for a social care worker will revolve around assisting a person’s day-to-day living through helping with meals, personal care, and social activities.

There are also shared lives carers, who will either take a vulnerable person into their homes or go and stay with them in theirs. This kind of arrangement can be worked out so the worker will be available on weekends, or just on days or evenings.

Depending on the environment in which you’re working, you can expect to be supporting people who have learning disabilities, physical problems, addiction issues, mental health issues, and more.

Wherever they’re found, it’s almost impossible to put into words the importance of our social care workers. So many people who require outside support rely on their social carers every day and often see a huge improvement to their lives as a result.

Okay, Sounds Good! So how do You get into this sector?

That’s the spirit! Although there are many degree-level qualifications available out there for those who’d like to hit the books before getting their hands dirty, the main things you’ll need are the right values which align with this kind of work.

Of course, it never hurts to go in with a bit of experience first, and so an apprenticeship may well be a good way to get your foot in the door. You can also pursue a work placement or volunteering scheme for a short while. Maybe you even have experience from your personal life which you can take with you into the field – it all counts!

To get the ball rolling, visit the SkillsForCare website and begin your journey as a social care worker today.

 

Registering with OUTT provides experienced social care candidates the opportunity to build an employer review base and take full control of where and when they work. It’s your life, live it! Register with us now!

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